Differences between Refined and Unrefined Salt

 PInk-Himalayan-sea-salt

 

It seems that in recent years, salt has gotten a very bad reputation – yet, the human body cannot live without salt. In fact, our bodies rely on it to help fight fungus, bacteria, and viruses. It’s important in the regulation of blood pressure, the proper functioning of the nervous system and brain cells, metabolism, digestion, adrenal function, and cell membrane permeability. It’s necessary to produce hydrochloric acid in stomach for digestion, reduces aldosterone (hormone released by adrenal glands to help regulate blood pressure) secretion in our endocrine (hormones that regulate body’s growth, metabolism, and sexual function) system, and it helps our body eliminate toxic substances by keeping them in solution. There’s so much more! However, not everyone realizes that there are different “types” of salt (refined and unrefined), and these differences will directly affect your health.

Many people strive to minimize their sodium intake in order to avoid high blood pressure, cardiovascular risk, bad kidneys, and so on. Patients get sent home from doctor visits with the recommendation to limit their sodium intake, and the first place they look to is their dining room table salt shaker. They decrease the amount of salt they put on their food in an effort to decrease their high reported sodium levels. Their effort is commendable, however, not as beneficial as learning the differences between refined and unrefined types of salt or sodium.

Sodium (that is unrefined) is a mineral found in many fruits, vegetables, legumes, and meats, naturally. When sodium is in its natural (unrefined) form, it helps to regulate body fluid because it’s an electrolyte, improves nerve function, glucose absorption, aids in muscle contraction, blood regulation, and does all the positives I listed in the opening paragraph. Our bodies need sodium! Just not the kind of sodium that it can’t recognize or break down – refined salt.

Common (refined) table salt (NaCl), which most people are accustomed to, is comprised of about 97.5% Sodium Chloride and 2.5% toxic chemicals (silicon dioxide, calcium silicate, corn sugar, iodine, aluminum silicate, and others that act as moisture absorbents and anti-caking agents to allow for easy pouring). This salt is easily recognized because of its white appearance and color. It’s highly processed – dried at over 1,200 degrees, bleached and chemically cleaned, resulting in the loss of trace minerals and essential macro-nutrients. It becomes something the body doesn’t recognize.

artificial-sea-salt-sodium

Unfortunately, those anti-caking agents perform the same function in our bodies as they do for the salt. Refined salt does not dissolve and combine with the water and fluids in our system (because our bodies don’t recognize it). Instead, it builds up in the body, and leaves deposits in our organs and tissues which cause severe health problems.

Two of the most common anti-caking agents used in the mass production of salt are:
1) sodium alumino-silicate
2) alumino-calcium silicate

Note that these are both sources of aluminum – a toxic metal that has been implicated in the development of Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s.

Considering this is the kind of salt on most people’s kitchen counters, as well as added to processed foods, dairy products, and condiments by manufacturers, it’s no wonder doctors are recommending people to reduce their sodium intake! They’re eating the WRONG KIND of sodium, common table salt, that’s in all processed foods incorporated into the standard American diet! May I just point out here, that this is yet ANOTHER reason to eat how God originally designed us to eat– His food?

Refined salt dominates the food market because it’s cheaper to use, and creates larger profit margins for manufacturing companies. Below are some of the negative effects associated with regular, white, refined table salt.

Inorganic sodium chloride, which is what table salt is, upsets your body’s fluid balance and causes dehydration. This happens because the body works to expel the excess toxic salt by pulling water from the cells. It’s trying to neutralize the damage by ionizing or separating the substance into chloride and sodium elements. For every gram of sodium chloride the body can’t get rid of, the body uses 23 times the amount of water to neutralize it.

Eating table salt can lead to unsightly cellulite, arthritis, gout, kidney and gallbladder stones, constipation, accumulations of toxins in the intestinal tract, hypertension, heart disease, strokes, asthma, and osteoporosis.

Let’s do a quick recap. Refined salt…
• is stripped of trace minerals
• is stripped of macro-nutrients
• is bleached
• is chemically cleaned
• is heated at high temperatures, changing the molecular structure
• is treated with 2% anti-caking agents and toxic chemicals
• causes dehydration
• upsets your body’s fluid balance
• increases “water weight”
• can lead to cellulite, arthritis, gout, kidney and gallbladder stones, constipation, hypertension, heart disease, strokes, asthma, osteoporosis, and accumulations of toxins in intestinal tract.

 

It is quite clear that table salt is not a healthy option, which begs us to ask, what is?

Himalayan Sea Salt (pink or red in color), Celctic Sea Salt (grayish in color), or Hawaiian Lava Salts (red or black in color) are all healthy alternatives that have not been bleached or tampered with. These are the types of salts that are full of minerals your body needs, and functions optimally on!

Himalayan-Sea-Salt

I personally love and use Himalayan Pink Sea Salt and Celtic Sea Salt. Both have 84 trace minerals and nutrients that the body needs, including magnesium, copper, potassium, iron, zinc, and calcium. I will mostly talk about Himalayan Sea Salt today, but Celtic Sea Salt is just as good, and very similar in health benefits. If you already use either of these types of salts, keep using them!

PInk-Himalayan-Sea-Salt

Himalayan Sea Salt is considered to be the purest form of whole salt on the planet. It is hand-mined and found naturally within the Himalayan Mountains. The pink color is a result of trace minerals – the deeper the color, the more concentrated the minerals.

The consumption of Himalayan Sea salt can…
• help our bodies utilize vitamins
• regulate heartbeat
• prevent muscle cramps
• maintain firmness in bones
• balance blood sugar and pH levels (alkalinity/acidity)
• regulate electrolyte balance of cells, which aids in conducting electricity (our bodies run off of this)
• supports nutrient absorption
• promote healthy sleep patterns
• reduce acid reflux
• regulate blood pressure
• improve circulation
• detoxify heavy metals
• promote sinus health
• supports your libido
• promote vascular health
• reduce cellulite
• reduce chances of developing kidney and gall bladder stones
• and much more!

Pink-Himalayan-Sea-Salt

Don’t be fooled by white salts labeled “sea salt” 

With the continued demand toward healthier food options, companies have found ways to confuse consumers even more. When you see “sea salt” options in your local grocery store that are bright white in color, stay far away!  White “sea salt” tends to be no different than regular table salt. It too undergoes a washing-out process that strips away most mineral content, and gets put through a heat process that destroys the complex micro-structures and benefits of real sea salt. White, processed salt can still be called “sea salt” even though it is devoid of full-spectrum sea minerals.

artificial-sea-salt-sodium

Sources: 

http://curezone.com/foods/salt/understanding_salt_and_sodium.htm
http://www.holistichealthsecrets.com/Himalayan-Crystal-Salt.html
http://www.globalhealingcenter.com/natural-health/himalayan-crystal-salt-benefits/
http://www.naturalnews.com/028724_Himalayan_salt_sea.html
http://www.himalasalt.com
http://www.mountainroseherbs.com/learn/pinksalt.php
http://products.mercola.com/himalayan-salt/
http://www.louix.org/the-difference-between-refined-salt-and-unrefined-salt/

Isn’t it incredible to see those differences? Now that you know that mineral rich salt (unrefined sea & celtic salts) are actually AWESOME for your health, you can go throw out any white salt in your home (unless you want to save it to salt your driveway after an ice storm, of course)!

Please eat mineral-rich salt, and feel good about doing so! Sometimes when your body is craving salty foods, it’s because it genuinely needs the minerals found in unrefined salt. You can even sprinkle salt in water and drink it to help with headaches!

The bottom line: White salt = Bad.

Gray, pink, black, and red salt = Good!

As a general rule, the more colorful your diet, and the less white foods you consume daily, the better!

 

P.S. Always remember to drink your greens, eat mineral-rich salt, help others, and stay fresh, people! Every time you purchase one jar of greens, over $8.00 is going to Fuel Hope‘s partner Pearl Alliance. If you purchase a 3-pack of greens, over $25.00 of your purchase is goes to Pearl Alliance. Together we can eradicate human trafficking!

NatureRich-Greens

28 comments


  • Kelly

    Where do you recommend buying this from??

    March 05, 2013
    • Hi Kelly,

      I recommend buying online from amazon.com 🙂 I usually look for the darkest option available and buy in 2 lb. increments (that lasts me about 1 year) 🙂 I also read the reviews to make sure that it is a darker color and trusted source. 🙂

      Let me know if you have any other questions, and ENJOY! 🙂

      March 06, 2013
  • […] I don’t understand why… well, actually I do. It’s because I load them up with mineral-rich Himalayan Sea Salt. These fries are the perfect mix of sweet and salty… they are addictive, and they are […]

    March 07, 2013
  • Nikki

    What about the iodine that’s added to table salt? What other foods provide this mineral?

    March 07, 2013
    • Hi Nikki,

      I appreciate your question. 🙂 We DO need the mineral iodine, as it is essential for our thyroid health among other things, however the amount we need is so minute and small that we can get enough of it in our versatile daily food supply. Over the course of your entire life, your body will only need less than one teaspoon of iodine total. Your body cannot store iodine though, so we have to eat minimal amounts of it every day. Himalayan Salt does naturally contain iodine, however it is a very trace amount. So in addition to Himalayan Sea Salt, you can find iodine naturally occurring in the list I included below. The iodine added to white table salt is a synthetic form of iodine and a form that your body does not recognize or know how to break it down, so it actually creates more damage than good.
      Below is a list of foods that contain Iodine naturally, and I also mention NatureRich greens because they contain Iodine through all of the sea minerals in them, and on top of that you are benefiting anti-human trafficking- win win! I hope that helps, let me know if you have any questions! 🙂

      Asparagus
      Lima beans
      Baked Potato with peel
      Mushrooms – NatureRich greens have these
      Sesame seeds
      Spinach – NatureRich greens have these
      Turnip greens
      Eggs
      Tuna
      Swiss chard
      Summer squash
      Soybeans

      Herbs containing Iodine include:
      Irish Moss – NatureRich greens have this
      Iceland Moss
      Blue-Green Algae – NatureRich greens have this
      Bladderwrack
      Dulse – NatureRich greens have this
      Kelp – NatureRich greens have this
      Red Marine Algae
      Chlorella
      Spirulina
      White Oat Bark
      Red Raspberry Leaf
      Black Walnut Hulls

      March 08, 2013
  • Useful information shared.. Iam happy to read this text.. thanks intended for giving you and me nice facts. Fantastic walk-through. I value this write-up.

    March 09, 2013
  • I Love this post! シャネル http://www.chanelkopi.com/

    March 14, 2013
  • […] 3/4 teaspoon himalayan pink sea salt […]

    March 14, 2013
  • […] to make the food taste as good. Usually they will make up for the fat with solutions like bad salt (see the differences between good salt and bad salt here), high fructose corn syrup, modified food starch (GMO origins), free glutamates (MSG, hydrolyzed […]

    March 18, 2013
  • Kris

    We just started buying the pink Himalayan salt. My question is do we use the same measurements in recipes as table salt or do we increase/decrease?

    August 03, 2013
    • Use salt always to your taste preferences. I always substitute it the same, but some people may say to do slightly less? I personally have not noticed anything being too salty, and I feel it transfers equal parts to equal parts just beautifully! 🙂 Way to go in making the switch, it is SO MUCH HEALTHIER. Stay fresh!

      December 09, 2013
  • Brenda

    Are all brands of Himalayan salt unrefined? Or does it have to specifically state unrefined on the bottle/bag?

    September 11, 2014
    • Any colored salt would be unrefined…. 🙂 gray (celtic), pink (Himalayan), black (Lava), etc… 🙂 You just don’t want white because all of the minerals are stripped out of it.

      October 20, 2014
  • […] the low-fat foods. They often contain: bad salt (see the differences between good salt and bad salt here), high fructose corn syrup, modified food starch (GMO origins), free glutamates (MSG, […]

    September 30, 2014
  • […] the low-fat foods. They often times have: bad sodium (see the differences between good salt and bad sodium here), large fructose corn syrup, modified meals starch (GMO origins), free glutamates (MSG, […]

    September 30, 2014
  • […] the low-fat foods. They often contain: bad salt (see the differences between good salt and bad salt here), high fructose corn syrup, modified food starch (GMO origins), free glutamates (MSG, […]

    September 30, 2014
  • […] the low-fat foods. They often contain: bad salt (see the differences between good salt and bad salt here ), high fructose corn syrup, modified food starch (GMO origins), free glutamates (MSG, hydrolyzed […]

    September 30, 2014
  • […] the low-fat foods. They often contain: bad salt (see the differences between good salt and bad salt here), high fructose corn syrup, modified food starch (GMO origins), free glutamates (MSG, […]

    October 01, 2014
  • […] the low-fat foods. They often contain: bad salt (see the differences between good salt and bad salt here), high fructose corn syrup, modified food starch (GMO origins), free glutamates (MSG, […]

    October 01, 2014
  • […] the low-fat foods. They often contain: bad salt (see the differences between good salt and bad salt here), high fructose corn syrup, modified food starch (GMO origins), free glutamates (MSG, […]

    October 01, 2014
  • […] even causing you to be MORE FAT! Skip the low-fat foods. They often contain: bad salt (see the differences between good salt and bad salt here), high fructose corn syrup, modified food starch (GMO origins), free glutamates (MSG, […]

    October 06, 2014
  • […] the low-fat foods. They often contain: bad salt (see the differences between good salt and bad salt here), high fructose corn syrup, modified food starch (GMO origins), free glutamates (MSG, […]

    October 13, 2014
  • […] the low-fat foods. They often contain: bad salt (see the differences between good salt and bad salt here), high fructose corn syrup, modified food starch (GMO origins), free glutamates (MSG, […]

    July 22, 2015
  • latisha gomez

    bleached? i have looked all over the net for information about this but have found none. while i agree that conventional table salt is not healthy, i would like to see your source for the claim that it is bleached. sadly, promoting ideas without reliable sources can do more harm than. thank you for an interesting article.

    August 30, 2015
    • Thank you for your interest. Although there are many sources for this information, I am going to list one out here — http://www.naturalnews.com/026080_salt_sodium_health.html and also inform you that I have friends who are chemists who have shown me the process that conventional salt undergoes. 🙂 I also agree with you that promoting ideas without reliable sources can do more harm than good and appreciate you taking the time to read and comment to ensure that I know what I am talking about. Thank you Latish!

      August 31, 2015
  • Thanks for finally writing about >Differences between Refined and Unrefined Salt – Life With Greens <Liked it!

    November 06, 2015

Leave a comment


Name*

Email(will not be published)*

Website

Your comment*

Submit Comment

Copyright © Dandelion by Pexeto